Sold Our Souls

In the famous book Uncle Tom's Cabin, the demonic plantation owner threatens to torture Tom if he doesn't beat a sick slave woman. When Tom refuses, Legree reminds Tom he owns him “body and soul.” 

Looking toward heaven Tom says,
“No! no! no! my soul an’t yours, Mas’re! You haven’t bought it,--ye can’t buy it! It’s been bought and paid for, by one that is able to keep it;--no matter, no matter, you can’t harm me!”(1)
Legree couldn’t beat the heaven out of Tom. In this one area, Tom had the “upper Hand.”

Tom is one of my literary heroes. And he represents real life Christians who persevered because they knew they'd been purchased by the Blood of Christ. (1 Corinthians 6:20). 

Whatever difficulties we suffer, Jesus is our ultimate Master and keeper of our souls.
copyright 2012, Gail Burton Purath
(1) Chapter 33, Uncle Tom's Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe, 1852
all illustrations are from early editions of Uncle Tom's Cabin as archived on Uncle Tom's Cabin & American Culture.


It’s one thing to trust Christ when things are relatively equal for us…it’s quite another to trust Him in the midst of inequality and oppression. 

I admire African American Christians who trusted Christ in the midst of mistreatment. 

And I pray that we will speak and act against all vestiges of bigotry left in our land. In the Name of Him Who bought us at great price, Gail

If you'd like Bible Love Note's 1-Minute devotions delivered to your email: 
For free email delivery enter your email address:


FeedBurner will send you an email. Click the link in that email to start your subscription.

7 comments:

  1. Thank you so much for this today, Gail. A powerful thought.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I am going to read this book next.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Make sure you have your box of kleenex...it's powerful and heart-breaking. President Lincoln called the author Harriet Beecher Stowe "the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war."

      Delete
  3. Like the baby elephant who is chained to a post and as he growns and his owners substitute the chain for a rope, he still believes he is bound. The truth is he can easily break free and go his way. He is no longer a slave. Many a black person has believed they were free and they went on to educate themselves and do great things for their country and for their families. Others are still shouting set us free and they do not accept the truth that they are already free and that all they need to do is walk away from their life of bondage and be a part of society. I have many black friends, who love Jesus and they are part of the answer and not the problem. I realize that blacks are not the only ones who are enslaved and believe they cannot break free of their chains. That is evident in the many re-hab centers and homeless shelters where something kept them from being free. Perhaps a mind set, or addictions that overrule their better judgement. Christ is the answer and the earlier we can present Jesus to a person - the better. This is why I support Children's ministries including Child Evangelism Fellowship and others.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The chained elephant is a good analogy for the treatment of blacks in our country. The entire purpose of chaining the elephant is to control him. After repeated failed attempts to be free, the elephant gives up hope. Then, his owners can control him with subtler forms of enslavement.

      The same is true with our treatment of blacks. Whites beat, killed and used blacks for their own purposes--chains.
      Then, when the law of the land freed the blacks, whites continued to control them for another hundred years by subtler forms of control like prejudice, fear, lack of jobs--ropes.

      Whatever problems exist now between black and white, white greed, cruelty and arrogance started the problems.

      Blacks need to forgive and move forward, but whites need to acknowledge what we did and repent.

      Thanks for suggesting this great analogy.

      Delete
  4. Gail, yes Christ paid the price for all. Thanks for your tribute post to Black History month. I liked it.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This is a beautiful, thanks for writing it! I also really love the post you recently wrote for bloggers. I'm currently working on a blog and it was great stuff for me to keep in mind :)

    ReplyDelete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...